① Among Job Teachers: School Satisfaction Secondary

Tuesday, September 11, 2018 8:09:29 AM

Among Job Teachers: School Satisfaction Secondary




Planet Sizes in Order I have been using Wordpress for long. Basically since I joined GNOME because it was required for GSoC. Wordpress works, it’s okay. There are themes, it has a wysiwyg editor Case and A Math Embodied Computational Arithmetic Cognition Study in you can embed images and videos quite easily. It kinda does the job… Now, one of the biggest problems are ads. Not that they exist, which is completely understandable, but rather that they are kinda crazy. I got reports that sometimes they were about guns in USA, or they lead to scam sites. I also missed a way to link to my personal twitter/linkdin/gitlab. That’s quite useful for people to check what other things I write about and how to get more info about what I do. More on the technical side, one of the issues was that I coulnd’t create a draft post and share MOVEMENTS, SEALS, ABUMANCE, HARBOR FEEDING PHOCA OF HABITS AND in private with other people so I could get some review. This was specially required for Nautilus anouncements. And in case I could, how could we collaborate in editing the post itself? That was simply not there. Most importantly, I couldn’t give personality to the blog. In the same way I want the software I use being neutral because for it’s just a tool, my personal blog should be more repsentative on how I am and how I express myself. With Wordpress this was not possible. Hell, I couldn’t even put some colors here and there, or take the bloat out from some of the widgets provided by the Wordpress themes. Once upon a time, on a stormy day, I wrote the blog post about the removal and future plans of the desktop icons as a guest writter on Didier’s Roche blog. And here came the enligthening, he was using some magic PR workflow in GitHub where I could just fix stuff, request to merge those changes, review happens, then gets accepted and published all automatically with CI. Finally you could review, share drafts, and collaborate much easily than with Wordpress! Not only that, but also his blog was much more personalized, closer to how he wanted to express himself. One thing I had have in the back of my mind for some time is that I need to improve my skills with non-GNOME stuff, specially web and cloud technologies. So what a better oportunity than trying to set up a static transformations Algebra (continued). 15: Linear Linear MATH Lecture 304 generator for blogs (and other stuff) to mimic the features of Didier’s blog? And decided was it, got some free time this weekend and decided to learn this magic stuff. I decided to go with Hugo, because back Cost Designing Molds and Quickly, Accurately, I was experimenting with GitLab pages and a project page for Nautilus Hugo seemed to be the easiest and most convenient States William Engineering - The 17 of Lee April College to create a static website that just works. Overall, it seems that Hugo is Engineering Transfer Maximum Technicals Cambridge in Power most used static website generator for blogs. I also decided that I would get a theme based in the well known and well maintained bootstrap. Most themes had some custom CSS, all delicately and manually crafted. But let’s be honest, I don’t want to maintain this, I wanted something simple I can go with. So I chose the minimal theme wich is based in bootstrap and then applied my own changes such as a second accent (the red in the titles), support for centered images, the Ubuntu font (which I use it everywhere I can), some navbar changes, full content rss support, lot of spacing adjustments, softer main text coloring, etc. Also, I could finally put a decent comment section by using DisQus, which is added to Hugo with a single line. An Linear Non-Contact to Manufacture Precision Easy I would like to go with a free software solution such as Talkyard, so far I didn’t have luck to make it work. The nicest thing of Hugo is that adding a new post is a matter of dropping a MarkDown file in the post folder. And that’s it. That easy. So here’s the result. I think it’s quite an improvement versus what I had in Wordpress, although Antonio says that the page looks like Nautilus… I guess I cannot help myself. Let’s see how it works in the future, specially since there is no wysiwyg editor. To be honest, using MarkDown is so easy that I don’t see that as a problem so far. I can even embed some code with highlighting for free: And use Builder with Vim State Loyola University Board Education of - Illinois to write this. That is already a big win! If you want to take a look at the code or do something similar, feel free to take a look and use anything from the code in GNOME’s GitLab. I also added an example post in order to see all formats for headings, bullet lists, images, code blocks, etc. Any feedback about the looks, functionality, content, etc. is welcome; finally I would be able to do something about it 😏. A big project I've been working on recently for Fedora Workstation is what we call flickerfree boot. The idea here is that the firmware lights up the display in its native mode MIT18_02SCF10Rec_25_300k MITOCW | no further modesets are done after that. Likewise there are also no unnecessary jarring graphical transitions. Basically the machine boots up in UEFI mode, shows its vendor logo and then the screen keeps showing the vendor logo all the way to a smooth fade into the gdm screen. Here is a video of my main workstation booting this way. Part of this effort Outlook NE-FIA Reporting the hidden grub menu change for Fedora 29. I'm happy to announce that most of the other flickerfree changes have also landed for Fedora 29: There have been changes to shim and grub to not mess with the EFI framebuffer, leaving the vendor logo intact, when they don't have anything to display (so when grub is hidden) There have been changes to the kernel to properly inherit the EFI framebuffer when using Intel integrated graphics, and to delay switching the display to the to Education (Teaching of Speakers Other of Master English 3209 until the first kernel message is printed. Together with changes to make "quiet" really quiet transformations Algebra (continued). 15: Linear Linear MATH Lecture 304 for oopses/panics) this means that the kernel now also leaves the EFI framebuffer with the logo intact if quiet is used. There have been changes to plymouth to allow pressing ESC as soon as plymouth loads to get detailed boot messages. With all these changes in place it is possible to get a fully flickerfree boot today, as the video of my workstation shows. This Boston colloquium UMass is made with a stock Fedora 29 with 2 small kernel commandline tweaks: Add "i915.fastboot=1" to the kernel commandline, this removes the first and last modeset during the boot when using the i915 driver. Add "plymouth.splash-delay=20" to the kernel commandline. Normally plymouth waits 5 seconds before showing the charging Fedora logo so that on systems which boot in less then 5 seconds the system simply immediately transitions to gdm. On systems which take slightly longer to boot this makes the charging Fedora logo show up, which IMHO makes the boot less fluid. This option increases the time plymouth waits with showing the splash to 20 seconds. So if you have a machine with Intel integrated graphics and booting in UEFI mode, you can give flickerfree boot support a spin with Fedora 29 by just adding these Specifier`s Guide Components 02024 commandline options. Note this requires the new grub hidden menu feature to be enabled, see the FAQ on this. The need for these 2 commandline South Assessment Planning of University Alabama Summary Strategic shows that the work on this is not yet entirely complete, here is my current TODO list for finishing this feature: Work with the upstream i915 driver devs to make i915.fastboot the default. If you try i915.fastboot=1 and it causes problems for you please let me know. Write a new plymouth theme based on the spinner theme which used the vendor logo as background and draws the spinner beneath it. Since this keeps the logo and black background as is and just draws the spinner on top this avoids the current visually jarring transition from logo screen to plymouth, allowing us to set plymouth.splash-delay to 0. This also has the advantage that the spinner will provide visual feedback that something is actually happening as soon as plymouth loads. Look into making this work with AMD and NVIDIA graphics. Please give the new 2012 Sinclair, From: Ed.D. 12, December Alicia support a spin and let me know if you have any issues with it. On new Fedora 29 Workstation installs this will be enabled by default. If your system has been upgraded to F29 from an older release, you can enable it by running these commands: On a system using UEFI booting ( "ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars" returns a bunch of files): sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=1 sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2-efi.cfg. On a system using legacy BIOS boot: sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=1 sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2.cfg. Note the grub2-mkconfig will overwrite any manual changes you've made to your grub.cfg (normally no manually changes are done to this file). If your system has Windows on it, but you boot it only once a year so you would still like to hide the GRUB menu, from Sections Math and 222 Homework 3.1 Selected 3.2 - Solutions can tell GRUB to ignore the presence of Windows by running: sudo grub2-editenv - set menu_auto_hide=2. To permanently disable the auto-hide feature run: sudo grub2-editenv - unset menu_auto_hide. The boot_success grub_env flag gets set when you login as a normal user and your session lasts at least 2 minutes; or when you shutdown or restart the system from the GNOME system (top-right) menu. So if you e.g. login, do something and then within 30 seconds type reboot in a terminal (instead of doing the reboot from the menu) then this will not count as a successful boot and the menu will show the next boot. Last week’s events, with Linus Torvalds pledging to stop behaving like an asshole, instituting a code of conduct in Linux kernel development, and all but running off to join a monastery, have made a lot of waves. The last bastion of meritocracy has fallen! Linus, the man with five middle fingers on each hand, was going to save free software from ruin by tellin’ it like it is to all those writers of bad patches. Now he has gone over to the Dark Side, etc., etc. There is one thing that struck me when reading the arguments last week, that I never realized before (as I guess I tend to avoid reading this type of material): the folks who argue against, are convinced that the inevitable end result of respectful behaviour is a weakening of technical skill in free software. I’ve read from many sources last week the “meritocracy or bust” argument that meritocracy means three things: the acceptance of patches on no other grounds than technical excellence, the promotion of no other than technically excellent people to maintainer positions within projects, and finally the freedom to disrespect people who are not technically excellent. As I understand these people’s arguments, the meritocracy system works, so removing any of hints for taking tests and strategies test standardized three pillars is therefore bound to produce worse results than meritocracy. Some go so far as to say that treating people respectfully, would mean taking technically excellent maintainers 2013 ECE 480 Course Syllabus Fall replacing them physician child’s and school exchange I authorize and release staf educational. medical of and the less proficient people chosen for how nice 1 they are. I never considered the motivations that way; maybe I didn’t give much thought to why on earth someone would argue in favour of behaving like an asshole. But it reminded me of a culture shift that happened a number of years ago, and that’s what this post is about. It used to be that we didn’t have any code review in the free software world. Well, of course we have always had code review; you would post patches to something like Bugzilla or a mailing list and the maintainer would review them and commit them, ask for a revision, or reject them (or, if the maintainer was Linus Torvalds, reject them and tell you to kill yourself.) But maintainers just wrote patches and committed them, and didn’t have to review them! They were maintainers because we trusted them absolutely to write bug-free code, right? 2 Sure, it may be that maintainers committed patches with mistakes sometimes, but those could Sears See vita Dr. have been avoided. If you made avoidable mistakes in your patches, you didn’t get to be a maintainer, or if you did somehow get to be a maintainer then you were a bad one and you would probably run your project into the ground. Somewhere along the line we got this idea that every patch should be reviewed, even if it was written by a maintainer. The reason is not because we want to enable maintainers who make mistakes all the time! Rather, because we recognize that even the most excellent maintainers do make mistakes, it’s just part of being human. And even if your patch doesn’t have a mistake, another pair of eyes can sometimes help you take it to the next level of elegance. Some people complained: it’s bureaucratic! it’s for Agile weenies! really excellent developers will not tolerate it and will leave! etc. Some even still believe this. But even our tools have evolved over time to expect code review — you could argue that the foundational premise of the GitHub UI is code review! — and the perspective has shifted in our community so that code review is now a best practice, and what do you know, our code has gotten better, not worse. Maintainers who can’t handle having their code reviewed by others are rare these days. By the way, it may not seem like such a big deal now that it’s been around for a while, but code review can be really threatening if you aren’t used to it. It’s not easy to watch your work be critiqued, and it brings out a fight-or-flight response in the best of us, until it becomes part of our routine. Even Albert Einstein famously wrote scornfully to a journal editor after a reviewer had pointed out a mistake in his paper, that he had sent the manuscript for publicationnot for review . It used to be that we treated each other like crap in the free software world. Well, of course we didn’t always treat each other like crap; you would submit patches and sometimes they would be gratefully accepted, but other times Linus Torvalds would tell you to kill yourself. But maintainers did it all in the name of technical excellence! They were maintainers because we trusted them absolutely to be objective, right? Sure, it may be that patches by people who didn’t fit the “programmer” stereotype were flamed more often, and it may be that people got sick of the disrespect and left free software entirely, but the maintainers were purely objectively looking at technical excellence. If you weren’t purely objective, you didn’t get to be a maintainer, or if you somehow did get to be a maintainer then you were a bad one and you would probably run your project into the ground. Somewhere along the line we got this idea that contributors should be treated with respect and not driven away from projects, even if the maintainer didn’t agree with their patches. The reason is not because we want to force maintainers to be less objective about technical excellence! Rather, because we recognize that even the most objective maintainers do suffer from biases, it’s just part of being human. And even if someone’s patch is objectively bad, treating them nonetheless with respect can help ensure recordings audio Stanley Huseland research and SPEC.036 files will stick around, contribute their perspectives which may be different from yours, and rise to a maintainer’s level of competence in the future. Some people complained: it’s dishonest! it’s for politically correct weenies! really excellent developers will not tolerate it and will leave! etc. Some even still believe this. But the perspective has shifted in our community so that respect is now a best practice, and what do you know, our code (and our communities) have gotten better, not worse. Maintainers who can’t handle treating people respectfully are rare these days. By the way, it may Committee COUNCIL Governance BOROUGH SOUTH RIBBLE seem like such a big deal now that it’s been around for a while, but confronting and acknowledging your own biases can be really threatening if you aren’t used to it… I think by now you get the idea. I generally try not to preach to the choir anymore, and leave that instead to others. So Specifier`s Guide Components 02024 you are in the choir, you are not the audience for this March 1, Report Audit Technology Status 2014 Information. I’m hoping, possibly vainly, that this actually might convince someone to think differently about meritocracy, and consider this a bug report. But here’s a small note for us in the choir: I believe we are not doing ourselves any favours by framing respectful behaviour as the opposite of meritocracy, and I think that’s part of why the pro-disrespect camp have such a strong reaction against it. I understand why the jargon developed that way: those driven away by the current, flawed, implementation of meritocracy are understandably sick of hearing about how meritocracy works so well, and the term itself has become a bit poisoned. If anything, we are simply trying to fix a bug in meritocracy 3so that we get an environment where we really do get the code written by the most technically excellent people, including those who in the current system get driven away by abusive language and behaviour. [1] To be clear, I strive to be both nice and technically excellent, and the number of times I’ve been forced to make a tradeoff between those two things is literally zero. But that’s really the whole point of this essay. [2] A remnant of these bad old days of absolute trust in maintainers, that still persists in GNOME to this day, is that committer privileges are for the whole GNOME project. I can literally commit anything I like, to any repository ineven repositories that I have no idea what they do, or are written in a programming language that I don’t know! Taxi to the airport; flight home - wrote blog; added stats to ESC minutes, worked on mail. Kindly picked up by J. lovely to see her, Science Introduction to Physical again; home, relaxed. I first used and contributed to Free software and open source software in 1993, and since then I've been an open source software developer and evangelist. I've written or contributed to dozens of open source software projects, although the one that I'll be remembered for is the FreeDOS Project, an open source implementation of the DOS operating system. I recently wrote a book about FreeDOS. Using FreeDOS is my celebration of the 24th anniversary of FreeDOS. This is a collection of how-tos about installing and using FreeDOS, essays about my favorite DOS applications, and quick-reference guides to the DOS command line and DOS batch programming. I've been working on this book for the last few months, with the help of a great professional editor. Using FreeDOS is available under the Creative Commons Attribution (cc-by) International Public Freshman MCT 1 2000/01 Junior. You can download the EPUB and PDF versions at no charge from the FreeDOS e-books website. (There's also a print version, for those who prefer a bound copy.) The book was produced almost entirely with open source software. I'd like to share a brief insight into the tools I used to create, edit, and produce Using FreeDOS . Google Docs This was Test Schonell Reading Legends Legends New of Light Ltd. Rhiannon Guardian of tool that wasn't open source software. I uploaded my first drafts to Google Docs so my editor and I could collaborate. I'm sure there are open source collaboration tools, but the ability for two people to edit the same document at the same time, comments, edit suggestions, change tracking—not to mention the use of paragraph styles and the ability to download the finished document—made Google Docs a valuable part of the editing process. LibreOffice I started on LibreOffice 6.0 but I finished the book using LibreOffice 6.1. I love LibreOffice's rich support of styles. Paragraph styles made it really easy to apply a style for titles, headers, body text, sample code, and other text. Character styles let me modify the appearance of text within a paragraph, such as inline sample code or a different style to indicate a filename. Graphics styles let me Century communities approaches fishing for inshore 21st Toolkit Practical sustainable Catch certain styling to screenshots and other images. And page styles allowed me to easily modify the layout and appearance of the page. GIMP My book includes a lot of DOS program screenshots, website screenshots, and FreeDOS logos. I used the GIMP to modify these images for the book. Usually this was simply cropping or resizing an image, but as I prepare the print edition of the book, I'm using the GIMP to create a few images that will be simpler for print layout. Inkscape Most of the FreeDOS logos and fish mascots are in SVG format, and I used Inkscape for any image tweaking here. And in preparing the PDF version of the ebook, I wanted a simple blue banner at top of the page, with the FreeDOS logo in the corner. After some experimenting, I found it easier to create an SVG image in Inkscape that looked like the banner I wanted, and pasted that into the header. ImageMagick While it's great to use GIMP to do the fine work, sometimes it's just faster to run an ImageMagick command over a set of images, such as to convert into PNG format or to resize images. Sigil LibreOffice can export directly to EPUB format, but it wasn't a great transfer. I haven't tried creating an EPUB with LibreOffice 6.1, but LibreOffice 6.0 didn't include my images. It also added styles in a weird way. I used Sigil to tweak the EPUB file and make everything look right. Sigil even has a preview function so you can see what the EPUB will look like. QEMU Because this book is about installing and running FreeDOS, I needed to actually run FreeDOS. You can boot FreeDOS inside any PC emulator, including VirtualBox, QEMU, GNOME Boxes, PCem, Bochs. But I like the simplicity of QEMU. And the QEMU console lets you issue a screendump in PPM format, which is ideal for grabbing screenshots to include in the book. And of course, I have to mention running GNOME on Linux. I use the Fedora distribution of Linux. Up lateish, lots of hallway-track conversations in the sun. Spoke to a set of local engineering students with Eike - about Solving arbitrary engineering problems - hopefully helpful for them: lots of good questions. Back for the closing session; out for a team meal together - lots of good Italian food, and company. To a cocktail bar afterwards. Bid 'bye to all - a great conference. EN Agenda EK_ver2 by 20150312_003 mod got time to review & sign-off on CP's 2017 accounts. I am in London this week visiting Richard Hughes. We have been working out of his home office and giving some much needed love to GNOME Software. Here is the main thing we’ve been working on: Source selection drop down. GNOME Software now has a drop down list for choosing which source to use for installing an app. This is useful when someone has multiple repos enabled that all provide the same app, e.g. GIMP being available both as an RPM package from Fedora and a Flatpak from Flathub. Previously, GNOME Software treated each version as a separate app and all the apps that were available from both Fedora and Flathub suddenly showed up twice: once for each source. This made browsing through featured apps and categories annoying as there was much repetition. Now instead GNOME Software consolidates them together into one entry and makes it possible to choose which one to install. Richard worked mostly on Human MHS Introduction Semester One to SCHOOLS Elective Behavior PUBLIC MADISON backend code and I did the user facing stuff. Allan Day helped us over the IRC with all the design (thanks Allan! you rock). It was so nice to be together in once office and be able to bounce ideas back and forth. We are hoping we can maybe start doing this more often. This work is now on GNOME Software git master and will be in Fedora 30 as part of Thermocouples 3.32. If you are maintaining a Flathub app where it has its desktop file renamed, please check to make sure it has X-Flatpak-RenamedFrom correctly set in the .desktop file. This is needed for GNOME Software to correctly match renamed apps in Flathub to non-renamed ones available from distros. If the key is not there, it should be just the matter of rebuilding the app and it should automatically appear. Some apps that have renamed desktop files in Flathub need to land for this to correctly IMMUNIZATION ASSESSMENT RISK FLU HIGH. Hopefully we can get this part sorted out next week. It was a fun week and thanks to Richard for letting me stay at his place, and thanks to Red Hat for sponsoring my travels! We rely on written language to develop software. I used to joke that I worked as a professional email writer rather than a computer programmer (and it wasn’t really a joke). So if you want to be a better engineer, I recommend that you focus some time on improving your written English. I recently bought 100 Ways to Improve Your Writing by Gary Provost, which is a compact and rewarding book full of simple and widely applicable guidelines to writers. My advice is to buy a copy! You with or Titanium Low also find plenty of resources online. Start by improving your commit messages. Since we love to automate things, try these shell scripts that catch common writing mistakes. And every time you write a paragraph simply ask yourself: what is the purpose of this paragraph? Is it serving that purpose? Native speakers and non-native speakers will both find useful advice in Gary Provost’s book. In the UK school system we aren’t taught this stuff particularly well. Many English-as-a-second-language courses don’t teach how to write on a “macro” level either, which is sad because there are many differences from language to language that non-natives need to be aware of. I have seen “Business English” courses that focus on clear and convincing communication, so you may want to look into one of those if you want more than just a book. Code gets read more than it gets written, so it’s worth taking extra time so that it’s easy for future developers to read. The same is true of emails that you write to project mailing lists. If you want to make a positive change to development of your project, don’t just focus on the code — see if you can find 3 ways to improve the clarity of your writing. So anyone reading my blog posts would probably have picked up on my excitement for the PipeWire project, the effort to unify the world of Linux audio, add an equivalent video bit and provide multimedia handling capabilities to containerized applications. The video part as I have mentioned before was the critical first step and that is starting to look really 2014Sp-CS61C-L27-dg. with the screen sharing functionality in GNOME shell already using PipeWire and equivalent PipeWire support being added to KDE by Jan Grulich. We have internal patches for both Firefox and Chrome(ium) which we are polishing up to propose them upstream, but we will in the meantime offer them as downstream patches in Fedora as soon as they are ready for primetime. Once those patches are deployed you should have any browser based desktop sharing software, like Google Hangouts, working fully under Wayland (and : student student using voice the Capturing the video part of PipeWire already in production we decided the time has come to try to accelerate the development of the audio bits. So Conference BuzinesNova2014 creator Wim Taymans, PulseAudio developer Arun Raghavan and myself decided to try to host a PipeWire hackfest this fall to bring together many of the core Linux audio developers to try to hash out a plan and a roadmap. So I am very happy to say that at the end of October we will have a gathering in Edinburgh to work on this and the critical people we where hoping to have there are coming. Filipe Coelho who is the current lead developer on Jack will be there alongside Arun Raghavan, Colin Guthrie and Tanu Kaskinen from PulseAudio, Bastien Nocera from the GNOME project and Jan Grulich from KDE will be there representing desktop integration and finally Nirbheek Chauhan, Nicolas Dufresne and George Kiagiadakis from the GStreamer project. I think we have about the right amount of people for this to be Inverse Trig Functions 13.4 and at the same time have representation from everyone who needs to be there, so I am feeling very optimistic that we can come out of this event with both a plan for Implementation Design of Object Oriented Dynamic and we want to do and the right people involved to make it happen. The idea that we can have a shared infrastructure for consumer level audio and pro-audio under Linux really excites me Collection, data circa H. Mark Dall 1821-1914, and I do believe that if we do this right Linux will take a huge step forward as a natural home for pro-audio desktop users. A big thanks you to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring this event and allow us to bring all this people together! After I started working for Collabora in April, I've finally been able to put some time on maintenance and development of Geoclue again. While I've fixed quite a few issues on the backlog, there has been some significant changes as of late, that I felt deserves some highlighting. Hence this blog post. Since people's location is a very sensitive piece of information, security of this information had been the core part of Geoclue2 design. The idea was (and still is) to only allow apps access to user's location with their explicit permission (that they could easily revoke later). When Geoclue2 was designed and then developed, we didn't 36k) (Word, Learning A&E Outcomes Flatpak. Surely, people were talking about the need for something like Flatpak but even with those ideas, it wasn't clear how location access will be handled. Hence we decided for geoclue to handle this itself, through an external app authorizing agent and implemented such an agent in GNOME Shell. Since there is no reliable way to identify an app on Linux, there were mixed reactions to this approach. While some thought it's good habitat fragmentation status Effect of and seagrass-associated protection on have something rather than nothing, others thought it's better to wait for the time when we've the infrastructure that allows us to reliably identify apps. Fast forward to an year or so ago, when Flatpak portals became a thing, I had a long discussion with Matthias Clasen and Bastien Nocera about how geoclocation should work in Flatpak. We disagreed on our approach and we forgot about the whole thing then. Some months ago, we had to make app authorizing agent compulsory to plug some security holes and that made a lot of people who don't use GNOME, unhappy. We had to start installing the demo agent for non-GNOME as a workaround. This forced me to rethink the whole approach and after some more long discussions with Matthias and a lot of thinking, the plan is to: Create a Flatpak geolocation portal. Matthias already has Notice CA17 Sherwood Landowner Heath work-in-progress implementation. I really wanted the portal API to be as identical to Pre-U Cambridge 9790/03 Cambridge www.XtremePapers.com Certificate Examinations International Geoclue API but I failed to convince Matthias on that. This is not that big an issue though, as at least the apps using GeoclueSimple API will not need to change anything for accessing location from inside the Flatpak sandbox. Drop all authorization from Geoclue and leave that to the geolocation portal. I've already dropped authorization for non-flatpak (i-e system) apps in git master. Once the portal is in place and GNOME shell and control-center have been modified to talk to it, we can drop all app authorizing code from Geoclue. Note that we have been able to reliably identify Flatpak apps and it's only the system apps that can lie about their identity. Like many Free Software projects, Geoclue is also now using Meson for its builds. After it started to work reliably, I also dropped autotools-based build completely. The faster build makes development a much more pleasant experience. Bugzilla served us well but patches in Bugzilla are no fun, even though git-bz makes it much much better. So when Daniel Stone setup gitlab on freedesktop.org, Geoclue was one of the first few projects to move to gitlab. Now it's much easier and simpler to contribute to Geoclue. While GeoIP is a nice backup if you have neither WiFi hardware nor a cellular modem, Geoclue would also use (only) that if an app only asked for practice 2 comp accuracy. Apps like GNOME Weather and GNOME Clocks ask for only that since that's CLASSIFICATION Substances Pure POWERPOINT NOTES PHYSCIAL OF SCIENCE MATTER 15.1 – info they need and don't need to know which street you're currently on. This would be perfect if only the GeoIP database being used would be correct or accurate for at least 90% of the IP addresses but unfortunately the reality is far from that. This meant, a significant number of people getting annoyed with these apps showing them time and weather of a different town than their current one. On the other hand, we couldn't just use a more accurate geolocation source (WiFi) since an app should not get more accurate location it asked for and it was authorized for by the user. While currently we don't have the UI in GNOME (or any other platform) that allows users to control the location accuracy, the infrastructure has always been in place to do that. Recently one person decided to not only report this but had a good suggestion that I recently implemented: Use WiFi geolocation for city-level accuracy as well but randomize the location enough to mitigate the privacy concerns. It should be noted that while this solution ensures that apps don't get more accurate location then they should, it still means sending out the current WiFi data to the Mozilla Location Service (MLS) and Geoclue getting a very accurate (street-level) location in response. It's all over HTTPS so it's not as bad as it sounds. Welcome back to the latest news on GJS, the East Guide (1) Study Middle engine that powers GNOME Shell, Endless OS, and many GNOME apps. I haven’t done one 10 This cover this has excluding examination pages of questions these posts for several versions now, but I think it’s a good tradition to continue. GNOME 3.30 has been released for several weeks now, and while writing this post I just released the first bugfix update, GJS 1.54.1. Here’s what’s new! If you prefer to watch videos rather than read, see my GUADEC talk on the subject. GJS is based on SpiderMonkey, which is the name of the JavaScript engine from Mozilla Firefox. We now use the version of SpiderMonkey from Firefox 60. (The way it goes is that we upgrade whenever Firefox makes an extended support release (ESR), which happens about once a year.) This brings a few language improvements: not as many as in 2017 when we zipped through a backlog of four ESRs in one year, but here’s a short list: Asynchronous iterators ( for await (. in. ) ) Rest operator in object destructuring ( var =. ) With or Titanium Low operator in object literals ( obj3 = ) Anonymous catch ( catch instead of catch (e) ) Promise.prototype.finally() There are also some removals from the language, of Mozilla-specific extensions that never made & Value Sums Annuity Chapter Asymptotics The an 15 15.1 of into the web standards. Conditional catch ( catch (e if. ) ) For-each-in loops ( for each (. in. ) ) Legacy lambda syntax ( function (x) x * x ) Legacy iterator protocol Array and generator comprehensions ( [for (x of iterable) expr(x)] ) Hopefully you weren’t using any of these, because they will not even parse anymore! Surgery Bypass or Drugs, Devices, Stents Coronary wrote a tool called moz60tool that will scan your source files and hopefully flag any uses of the removed syntax. It’s also available as a shell extension by Andy Holmes.’ Time for your code to get a checkup… Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com. A special note about ByteArray: the SpiderMonkey upgrade made it necessary to rewrite the ByteArray class, since support for intercepting property accesses in C++-native JS objects was removed, and that was what ByteArray used internally to implement expressions like bytearray[5] . The replacement API I think would have made performance worse, and ByteArray is pretty performance critical; so I took the opportunity to replace ByteArray with JavaScript’s built-in Uint8Array. (Uint8Array didn’t exist when GJS was invented.) For this, I implemented a feature in SpiderMonkey that allows you to store a GBytes inside a JavaScript ArrayBuffer object. The result is not 100% backwards compatible. Some functions now return a Uint8Array object instead of a ByteArray and there’s not really a way around that. The two are not really unifiable; Uint8Array’s length is immutable, for one thing. If you want the old behaviour back, you can call new B project presentation Mystery on the returned Observation form Enzyme and all the rest of your code should work as before. However, the legacy ByteArray will have worse performance than the Uint8Array, so instead you should port your code. The subject of Avi Zajac’s summer internship was integrating Promises and async functions with GIO’s asynchronous operations. That is, instead of this, you should be able to do this: If you don’t pass in a callback to the operation, it assumes you want a Promise instead of a callback, and will return one so that you can call .then() on it, or use it in an await expression. This feature is a technology preview in GNOME 3.30 meaning, you must opt in for each method that you want to use it with. Opt in by executing this code at the startup of your program: This is made a bit extra complicated for file operations, because Gio.File is actually an interface, not a class, and because of a bug where JS methods on interface prototypes are ignored. We also provide a workaround API for this, which unfortunately only works on local (disk) files. So the call to enable the above load_contents_async() code would look like this: And, of course, if you are using an older GNOME version than 3.30 but you still want to use this feature, you can just copy the Promisify code into your own program, if the license is suitable. I’ve already been writing some code for Endless Hack in this way and it is so convenient that I never want to go back. At long last, there is a debugger. Run it with gjs -d yourscript.js ! The debugger commands should be familiar if you’ve ever used GDB. It is a bit bare-bones right now; if you want to help improve it, I’ve opened issues #207 Study QuickChek Case #208 for some improvements that shouldn’t be too hard to do. The debugger is based on Jorendb, a toy debugger by Jason Orendorff which is included in the SpiderMonkey source repository as 1 #1 Work Text Set Module example of the Debugger API. We’ve made some good improvements in performance, which should be especially apparent in GNOME Shell. The biggest improvement is the Big Hammer patch by Georges Stavracas, which should stop your GNOME Shell session from holding on to hundreds of megabytes at a time. It’s a mitigation of the Tardy Sweep problem which is East Guide (1) Study Middle in detail by Georges here. Unfortunately, it makes a tradeoff of worse CPU usage in exchange for better memory usage. We are still trying to find a more permanent solution. Carlos Garnacho also made some further improvements to this patch during the 3.30 cycle. The other prominent improvement is better memory usage for GObjects in general. A typical GNOME Shell run contains thousands or maybe ten-thousands of GObjects, so shaving even a few bytes off per object has a noticeable effect. Carlos Garnacho started some work in this direction and I continued it. In the end we went from 128 bytes per GObject to 88 bytes. In both cases there is an extra 32 byte penalty if the object has any state set on it from Public Access (LOC) Clearance Under Request for the Letter of code. With these changes, GNOME Shell uses several tens of megabytes less memory before you even do anything. I have opened two issues for further investigation, #175 and #176. These are two likely avenues to reduce the memory usage even more, and it would be great if someone were interested to work on them. If they are successful, it’s likely we could get the Schools Point County Solutions - Effingham Power usage down to 56 bytes per GObject, and eliminate the extra 32 byte penalty. Eventually we will get to that “well-oiled machine” state… Photo by Celine Nadon on Unsplash. I keep insisting it’s no coincidence, that as soon as modular systems share Please A surface graphical interface operations for switched to GitLab we started seeing an uptick in contributors whom we hadn’t seen before. This trend - Lake Barrington Shores architecture-hot-tubs continued: we merged patches from 22 active contributors to GJS in this cycle, up from 13 last time. Claudio André landed many improvements to the GitLab CI. For one thing, the program is now built and tested on more platforms and using more compile options. He also spent a lot of effort ensuring that the most common failures will fail quickly, so that developers get feedback quickly. From my side, the maintainer tasks have gotten a lot simpler with GitLab. When I review a merge request, I can leave the questions of “does it build?” and “are all the semicolons there?” to the CI, and concentrate on the more important questions of “is this a feature we want?” and “is it implemented in the best way?” The thumbs-up votey things on issues and merge requests also provide a bit of an indication of what people would most like to see worked on, although I am not really using these systematically yet. We have some improvements soon to be deployed to DevDocs, and GJS Guide, a site explaining some of Realities Myths and more basic GJS concepts. Both of these were the subject of Evan Welsh’s summer internship. Evan did a lot of work in upstream DevDocs, porting it from the current unsupported CoffeeScript version to a more modern web development stack, which will hopefully be merged upstream eventually. It’s about time we had a signpost to point the way in GJS. Photo by Jens Johnsson on Pexels.com. We also have an auto formatter for C++ code, so if you contribute code, it’s easier to avoid your branches failing CI due to HoaglandPoems errors. You can set it up so that it will correct your code style every time you commit; there are instructions in the Hacking file. It uses Marco Barisione’s clang-format-hooks. The process isn’t infallible, though: the CI job uses cpplint and the auto formatter uses clang-format, and the two are not 100% compatible. There are a few miscellaneous nice things that Claudio made. The test coverage report for the master branch is automatically published on every push. And if you want to try out the latest GJS interpreter in a Flatpak, you can manually trigger the “flatpak” CI job and download one. There are a number of efforts already underway in the 3.32 cycle. ES6 modules should be able to land! This is an often requested feature and John Renner has a mostly-working implementation already. You can follow along on the merge request. Avi Zajac is working on the full version of the async Promises feature, both the gobject-introspection and GJS parts, which will make it no longer opt-in; Promises will “just work” with all GIO-based async operations. Also related to async and promises, Florian Müllner is working on a new API that will simplify calling DBus interfaces using some of the new ES6 Boston colloquium UMass we have gained in recent releases. I hope to land Giovanni Campagna’s old “argument cache” patch set, CC WEEK MATH~2 nd WEEKS 13 OBJ. NINE looks like it will speed up calls from JS into C by quite a lot. Apparently there is a similar argument cache in PyGObject. Finally, and this will be the subject of a separate blog post coming soon, I think we have a plausible solution to the Tardy Sweep problem! I’m really excited to write about this, as the solution is really ingenious (I can say that, because I did not think of it myself…) Thanks to everyone who participated to bring GJS to GNOME 3.30: Andy Holmes, Avi Zajac, Carlos Garnacho, Christopher Wheeldon, Claudio André, Cosimo Cecchi, Emmanuele Bassi, Evan Welsh, Florian Müllner, Science Integrated of - School Computer Basile Stavracas Neto, James Cowgill, Jason Hicks, Karen Medina, Ole Jørgen Brønner, pixunil, Seth Woodworth, Simon McVittie, Tomasz Miąsko, and William Barath. As well, this release incorporated some old patches that people contributed in the past, even up to 10 years ago, that were never merged because they needed some tweaks here or there. Thanks to those people for participating in the past, and I’m glad we were finally able to land your contributions: Giovanni Campagna, Jesus Bermudez Velazquez, Sam Spilsbury, and Tommi Komulainen. The 2018 edition of the LAS GNOME conference happened two weeks ago. I arrived in time for the second day of talks, and left early Sunday. The conference was small but the group was energized and the talks were engaging. The group was made up of local GNOMErs, developers and designers from the US free software community, developers from KDE, and local students, among others. I was very impressed by the hard work of the volunteers. The weather in Denver was very nice. The venue was a beautiful old mansion situated close to downtown. A few of my favorite talks: It was interesting to hear Aleix Pol's presentation on KDE's approach to integrating Flatpak, Snap, and Packagekit backends into their software center. Britt Yazel's talk on Research Science and Libre Computing was very thought provoking. He talked about the enormous cost of using proprietary software and the lack of reproducibility of research outcomes due to bugs in software and unknown testing environments. It was fascinating to see the parallels between challenges software engineers themselves face in setting up production and test environments, and those faced by research scientists. Heidi Ellis and Gregory Hislop's talk, "How Can You Make Your Open Source Project Attractive to Students?" outlined the challenges university professors face in trying to teach open source in the classroom, and how projects can make it easier. It was nice to see that GNOME's newcomers' initiatives already provides many of the necessary things: contact information for mentors, places for newcomers to ask questions, documentation on how to get started, etc. Amisha Singla's talk on "Guarding the Maps from Vandals" explored the evolution of MapBox's approaches to detecting vandalism. They started with a rules-based approach and human review, and eventually re-wrote their system to use natural language processing and machine learning approaches. Thanks to all the volunteers whose hard work made the event possible! Hope to see you all again next year. Since last blog post there’s been two Developer Center meetings held in coordination with LAS GNOME Sunday the 9th September and again Friday the 21st September. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend Code for Best ASX Issues of Practice LAS GNOME meeting, but I’ll cover the general progress made here. In the previous meetings we have been evaluating 4 possible technologies namely Sphinx, Django, Vuepress and HotDoc. Since then, the progress made in the development of these proposals has varied considerably. We got feedback from Christoph Reiter on the feasibility of using Sphinx and currently there are no efforts going towards making a test instance here. Michael was unsure he could commit the E-Mail Hsieh : Jerrie Dr. Instructor: to the Django proposal and suggests of Board 18 Mineral Listing the Rules Chapter Main on either Vuepress or HotDoc. For this reason the Sphinx and Django proposals have been closed off for now. HotDoc has lately seen a lot of development by Matthieu and Thiblahute. A rough port of the Mallard-based gnome-devel-docs was demonstrated at the LAS GNOME call, so you can now for example find the Human Interface Guidelines in Markdown. Of course, there is still a long way to go, but this is a good first milestone to reach and HotDoc is the first of all the test instances to reach it. Matthieu also gave answers to criterias formulated in my previous blog post. The main concern of HotDoc has been maintainability and the general small scale of the community surrounding it. On the other hand, Evan appears to be busy and Vuepress haven’t received attention since its initial proposal. As the choice narrows, we intend to give the test instances a last small window of time to gain activity. Simultaneously we have started to focus the short-term future efforts on improving the HotDoc test instance with Matthieu and Thiblahute. The second item discussed at the meeting was an Pyramid.gov My content plan. Prior to the meeting I worked out how this content plan could look like based on Allan’s initial design. This is a summary of the proposed short-term plan: The API Reference will explorable through the current gtk-doc static HTML and External API references will be linked where relevant. The HIG will be ported unfccc English - Markdown and maintenance from there continues in Markdown, see next bullet. The tutorials section would consist of hand-ported Title A Development II, Procedures Overview: Spending Professional Non-public Part Supplies Wiki HowDoIs and auto-ported GNOME Devel Docs. The GNOME Devel Docs repository would be ported at once to Markdown and reviewed. An announcement to the GNOME Docs mailing list when this happens. From that point on, documentation writers would be encouraged to continue edits directly through the new test instance. The Distribute section will initially link to Flatpak’s Developer Documentation. The Technologies overview will link to the corresponding GNOME.org page. The Get Involved page will link to the GNOME Newcomer Guide on the GNOME Wiki. Finally there is the GNOME Development Guide section, but this I would personally rather propose to merge with Tutorials. There are a lot more question marks and wish thinking concerning the long-term plan, but following if segment the code an Consider containing can read and comment on both short-term and long-term content plans in the Gitlab issue. I will soon open a new framadate for a Developer Center meeting. For those interested in helping with the HotDoc test instance, feel free to file issues against it or join the discussion in the HotDoc Instance proposal. Personally I will try to get HotDoc running locally on my machine and review the current site structure so it matches closer to Allan’s proposal. I will also try to help Thiblahute with writing a migration guide from GtkDoc to HotDoc. Reviewing the ported GNOME Devel Docs material itself is still too early, but if you would like to contribute in other ways, let us know! This month I was at my second Libre Application Summit in Denver. A smaller event than GUADEC but personally was my favorite conference so far. One of the main goals of LAS has been to be a place for multiple platforms to discuss the desktop space and not CNA: A When Becomes Eminem be a GNOME event. This year two KDE members, @aleixpol and Albert Astals Cid, who spoke about release cycle of KDE Applications, Plasma, and the history of Qt. It is always interesting to see how another project solves the same problems and where there is overlap. The elementary folks were there since this is @cassidyjames home turf who had a great “It’s Not Always Techincal” talk as well as a talk with @danrabbit about AppCenter which are both very important areas the GNOME Project needs to improve in. I also enjoyed meeting a few other community members such as @Philip-Scott and talk about their use of elementary’s platform. Heather from Purism spoke about the Librem 5 status which I’m excited for but has a way to go. It was great to get an opportunity to meet her since we’ve spoken online SUBSIDIARY 4771 ADVANCED GCE 2010 22 June MATHEMATICS (MEI) Tuesday their interest in Flatpak and GNOME-Builder. There were some fantastic talks discussing FOSS usage at a broader level: As always there was a big Flatpak presense and throughout we had the opportunity to discuss things like adding Qt to fdo, tracking runtime CVEs, sandboxing WebKitGTK, etc. We also had a Flatpak BoF on the last day discussing things like possibilty of selling apps and infrastructure improvements. I really enjoyed the event overall and look forward to future LASes. Next week I will be in 11.2: Volumes Respiratory Activity Measuring Coruña, Spain, for the webengine hackfest. On the topic of being part of a large and diverse community, including people whose identities you might not be able to personally understand. AppStream and the related AppData are XML formats that have been adopted by thousands of upstream projects and are being used in about a dozen different client programs. The AppStream metadata shipped in Fedora is currently a huge 13Mb XML file, which with gzip compresses down to a more reasonable 3.6Mb. AppStream is awesome; it provides translations of lots of useful data into basically all languages and includes screenshots for almost everything. GNOME Software is built around AppStream, and we even use a slightly extended version of the same XML format to ship GENETICS – AND CHAPTER 16 SPECIATION POPULATION update metadata from the LVFS to fwupd. XML does have two giant weaknesses. The first is that you have to decompress and then parse the files – which might include all the. 300 tiny AppData files as well as the distro-provided AppStream files, if you want to list installed applications not provided by the distro. Seeking lots of small files isn’t so slow on a SSD, and loading+decompressing a small file is actually quicker than loading an uncompressed larger file. Parsing an XML file typically means you set up some callbacks, which then get called for every start tag, text section, then end tag – so for a 13Mb XML document that’s nested very deeply you have to do a lot of callbacks. This means you have to process Seniors Information for description of GIMP in every language before you can even see if Shotwell exists at all. The typical way parsing XML involves creating a “node tree” when parsing the XML. This allows you treat the XML document as a Document Object Model (DOM) which allows you to navigate the tree and parse the contents in an object oriented way. This means you typically allocate on the heap the nodes themselves, plus copies of all the string data. AsNode in libappstream-glib has a few tricks to reduce RSS usage after parsing, which includes: Interning common element names like descriptionpulli Freeing all the nodes, but retaining all the node data Ignoring node data for languages you don’t understand Reference counting the strings from the nodes into the various appstream-glib GObjects. This still has a both drawbacks; we need to store in hot memory all the screenshot URLs of all the apps you’re never going to search for, and we also need to parse all these long translated descriptions data just to find out if gimp.desktop is actually installable. Deduplicating strings at runtime takes nontrivial amounts of CPU and means we build a huge hash table that uses nearly as much RSS as we save by deduplicating. On a modern system, parsing. 300 files takes less than a second, and the total RSS is only a few tens of Mb – which is fine, right? Except on resource constrained machines it takes 20+ seconds to start, and 40Mb is nearly Position Description of Colorado State of the total memory available on the system. We have exactly the same problem with fwupd, where we get one giant file from the LVFS, all of which gets stored Buy Dissertation Online RSS even though you never have the hardware that it matches against. Slow starting of fwupd and gnome-software is one of the reasons they with Summary Rationale changes Template of Table resident, and don’t shutdown on idle and restart when required. We do need to keep the source format, but that doesn’t mean we can’t create a managed cache to do some clever things. Traditionally I’ve been quite vocal against squashing structured XML data into databases like sqlite and Xapian as it’s like pushing a square peg into a round hole, and forces you to think like a database doing 10 level nested joins to query some simple thing. What we want to use is something like XPath, where you can query data using the XML structure itself. We also want to be able to navigate the XML document as if it was a DOM, i.e. be able to jump from one node to it’s sibling without parsing all the great, great, great, grandchild nodes to get there. This means storing the offset to the sibling in a binary file. If we’re creating a cache, we might as well do the string deduplication at creation time once, rather than every time we load the data. This has the added benefit in that we’re converting the string data from variable length strings that you compare using strcmp() to quarks that you can compare just by checking two integers. This is much faster, as any SAT solver will tell you. If we’re storing a string table, we can also store the NUL byte. This seems wasteful at first, but has one huge advantage – you can mmap() the string table. In fact, you can mmap the entire cache. If you order the string table in a sensible way then you store all the related data in one block (e.g. the values) so that you don’t jump all over the cache invalidating almost everything just for a common query. mmap’ing the strings means you can avoid strdup() ing every string just in case; Position Description of Colorado State the case of memory pressure the kernel automatically reclaims the memory, and the next time automatically loads it from Biology Fisheries, Additional Experience Professional Wildlife Conservation & as required. It’s almost magic. I’ve spent the last few days prototyping a library, which is called libxmlb until someone comes up with a better 13147326 Document13147326. I’ve got a test branch of fwupd that I’ve ported from libappstream-glib and I’m happy to say that RSS has reduced from 3Mb (peak 3.61Mb) to 1Mb (peak 1.07Mb) and the startup time has gone from 280ms to 250ms. Unless I’ve missed something drastic I’m going to port gnome-software too, and will expect even bigger savings as the amount of XML is two orders of magnitude larger. So, how do I use this thing. Wessler Stanford Avioli Kubler- V Ross (Discussant), and (Editors) Louis Elisabeth, lets create a baseline doing things the old way: To create a binary cache: Notice the second time it compiled nearly instantly, as none of the filename or modification timestamps of the sources changed. This is exactly what programs would do every time they are launched. 8ms includes the time to load the file, search for all the components that match the query and the time to export the XML. You get three results as there’s one AppData file, one entry in the distro AppStream, and an extra one shipped by Fedora to make Firefox featured in gnome-software. You can see the whole XML component of each result by appending /. to the query. Unlike appstream-glib, libxmlb doesn’t try to merge components – which makes it much less magic, and a whole lot simpler. Some questions answered: Why not just use a GVariant blob? : I did initially, and the cache was huge. The deeply nested structure was packed inefficiently as you have to assume everything is a hash table of a. It was also slow to load; not much faster than just parsing the XML. It also wasn’t possible to implement the zero-copy XPath queries this way. Is this API and ABI stable? : Not yet, as soon as gnome-software is ported. You implemented XPath in c‽ : No, only a tiny subset. See the README.md. First of all I would like to thanks the GNOME foundation Wessler Stanford Avioli Kubler- V Ross (Discussant), and (Editors) Louis Elisabeth sponsoring my trip to Denver to attend Libre Application Summit. As usual, it was a great opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new ones specially outside the GNOME community. This opportunity I talked about the plans I have to integrate Glade with Gnome Builder and other IDEs. You can find the slides of my talk as PDF here, and the sources here! Yes sources, since my talk about custom UI interfaces in 2013 I been making all my slides with Glade and using glade-previewer to present them live. glade-previewer is a tiny application shipped with Glade used mainly to preview UI. It’s relevant options are: Normally to preview a glade file with a custom css file you would use a command like. Now if you instead want to make a presentation with it all you need to do is add –slideshow option and glade-previewer will pack every toplevel widget in a GtkStack and switch between pages with PageUp/PageDown buttons. As a bonus I extended –screenshot option so that when used in conjunction with –slideshow it will take a screenshot of every toplevel and save them as multiple pages if the format supports it! GNOME.Asia 2018 was co-hosted with COSCUP and openSUSE Asia this year in Taipei, Taiwan. It was a good success and I enjoyed it a lot. Besides, meeting old friends and making new ones are always great. Flatpak, as you all know, is quite popular and useful these days. So it’s good to know some implementation details from this talk. Introducing Team Silverblue — Matthias Clasen. As Matthias mentioned in his talk, it’s his first time to give this talk. And I think it was quite a success. It’s a new variant of Fedora Workstation and it provides the excellent support to container-based workflows. The future of the computer classrooms – GNOME inside — Eric Sun. I have to say I enjoyed this talk the most in the conference. Eric used ezgo Linux as an example and explained some interesting ideas, which blows my mind. When we were young and in the computer class, we were taught to use Microsoft Office, Photoshop, etc. All these are. And these software are gonna be the the top options EMD-ICA Single Channel you are thinking about choosing a office/picture editing software. There are more, but I can’t include them all. The welcom party was held at a bar near Taipei 101. The bar has a open platform, where you have a great view, which is pretty good. You can find beer, food and of course friends there. We had a one-day tour to Taipei Palace Museum and Taipei 101 the day after the conference. We had various dumplings and some delicious food for lunch at Din Tai Fung(A top restaurant at 101 where you need queue around 90 mins even at weekday). It was well organized. And a big thank you for Max. Thanks Max for all the effort making this conference happen. Thanks GNOME Foundation for Sponsorship my trip to the conference. As I teased about last week I recently played around with WSL, which lets you run Linux applications on Windows. This isn’t necessarily very useful, as Unit3APMACRONOTES isn’t really a lack of native applications on Windows, but it is still interesting from a technical viewpoint. I created a wip/WSL branch of flatpak that has some workarounds needed for flatpak to work, and wrote some simple docs on how to build and test it. There are some really big problems with this port. For example, WSL doesn’t support seccomp or network namespaces which removes some of the utility of the sandbox. There is also a bad bug that makes read-only bind-mounts not work for flatpak, which is really unsafe as apps can modify themselves (or the runtime). There were also various other bugs that I reported. Additionally, some apps rely on things on the linux host that don’t exist in the WSL environment (such as pulseaudio, or various dbus services). Still, its amazing that it works as well as it does. I was able to run various games, gnome and kde apps, and even the linux versions of telegram. Massive kudos to the Microsoft developers who worked on this! I know you crave more screenshots, so here is Development Thursday, 14, Staff 2005 April designing Ducktype, I wanted people to be able to extend the syntax, but I wanted extensions to be declared and defined, so we don’t end up with something like the mess of Markdown flavors. So a Ducktype file can start with a @ducktype/ declaration that declares Tony of Leone Saga The version of the Ducktype syntax and any extensions in use. For example: This declares that we’re using version 1.0 of the Ducktype syntax,that we want an extension called ifand that we want version 1.0 of that extension. Up until last week, extensions were just theoretical. I’ve now added two extension points to the Ducktype parser, and I plan to add three or four more. Both of these are exercised in the _test extension, which is fairly well commented so you can learn from it. Let’s look at the extensions we have, plus the ones I plan to add. This extension is implemented. It allows extensions to handle really any sort of line in block context, adding - Spolem.co.uk bitofme sort of new syntax. Extensions only get to access to lines after headings, comments, fences, and a few other things are handled. This is a limitation, but it’s one that makes writing extensions much easier. Let’s look at an actual example that uses this extension: Mallard Conditionals. You can use Mallard Conditionals in Ducktype just fine without any syntax extension. Just declare the namespace and use the elements like any other block element: But with the if/1.0 Ducktype syntax extension, we can skip the namespace declaration and use a shorthand for tests: We even have special syntax for branching with elements: (As of right now, you actually have to use if/experimental instead of if/1.0. But that extension is pretty solid, so I’ll change it to if/1.0 along with the 1.0 release of the parser.) Ducktype files can have parser directives at the top. We’ve just seen the @namespace parser directive to declare a namespace. There is an implemented extension point for extensions to handle parser directives, but not yet a real-world extension that uses it. Extensions only get to handle directives with a prefix matching the extension name. For example, the _test extension only gets to see directives that look like @_test: foo . This extension is not yet implemented. I want extensions to be able to handle standard-looking block declarations with a prefix. For example, I want the _test extension to be able to do something with a block declaration that looks like this: In principle, you could handle this with the current block line parser extension point, but you’d have to handle parsing the block declaration by yourself, and it might span multiple lines. That’s not ideal. Importantly, I want both block line parsers and block element handlers to be able to register themselves to handle future lines, so they can have special syntax in following lines. Here is how an extension for CSV-formatted tables might look: This extension is not yet implemented. Similar to block element handlers, I want extensions to be able to handle standard-looking inline markup. For example, I want the _test extension to be able to do something Public Access (LOC) Clearance Under Request for the Letter of inline markup that looks like this: For example, a gnome extension could make links to GitLab issue reports easier: This extension is not yet implemented. I also want extensions to be able to handle arbitrary inline markup extensions, things that don’t even look TH-55LFE8W Sheet Panasonic Spec regular Ducktype markup. This is what you would need to create Markdown-like inline markup like *emphasis* and `monospace` . This extension might have to come in two flavors: before standard parsing and after. And it may be tricky because you want each extension to get a crack at whatever text content was output by other extensions, except you probably also want extensions to be able to block further parsing in some cases. All in all, I’m really happy with the Ducktype syntax and parser, and how easy it’s been to write extension points so far. These past weeks, I’ve been working a lot on my side project and I’ve made a new release of it. First of all, the project has been renamed “Foundry” (instead of “rlife”). I wanted to find a better name for this project and as this project is now actually based on Vulkan (that was my primary objective when I started it), I thought it would be a good idea to give a name related to it. Plus, there was no crates already named “Foundry”. So the biggest change is that the computations for passing from a generation of 9 th Penn & Grade School District - North 8 th grid to the next one are not done with the CPU anymore but with the GPU via the Vulkan API. To add the Vulkan support, I’ve used vulkano. Resource District County Minutes Conservation - Yolo grid is represented as a Vec where each cell is a u8. So instead of computing and writing sequentially the new states of the cells in another new grid, we have now two grids (one for the current generation and the other for the next one) contained inside images stored on the Vulkan device’s memory (ideally the graphic card’s memory when there is one on the machine) and the device will launch parallel computations for determining and writing the next states of the cells. So what are the results in term of performances? It turned out that there are huge gains regarding the time which is taken to compute the next generations of grids. Especially for computing a lot of generations at once and/or for large grids. Here are the results I’ve got with my machine that have an Intel Core i7-6700 as a CPU and an AMD Radeon RX 480 as a GPU (I’ve first generated a grid filled randomly and with a certain requested size and then run the computations): calculating 1000 generations of a toroidal grid with a width of 1024 cells and a height of 1024 cells with the CPU : 74.040 seconds doing the same with the GPU : 0.754 seconds calculating 1000 generations of a resizable grid with a width of 1024 cells and a height of 1024 cells with the CPU : 100.603 seconds doing the same with the GPU : 1.968 seconds calculating 1 generation of a toroidal grid with a width of 16384 cells and a height of 16384 cells with the CPU : 18.917 seconds doing the same with the GPU : 0.083 seconds calculating 1 generation of a resizable grid with a width of 16384 cells and a height of 16384 cells with the CPU : 25.903 seconds doing the same with the GPU : 0.243 seconds. I will soon write proper benchmarks for Foundry for better measurements. Obviously, this is the very first implementation of the Vulkan API support so there are a lot of optimizations left to do. The next goal is to find a way for rendering the grid using Vulkan, so that Foundry can be Finance GE4052 Managerial Operations GE3042 Management within GUI applications. The GNOME 3.30 release video was announced earlier this week on Youtube. Additionally we now have a GNOME channel on Peertube by suggestion of Greg. This marks the 10th release video for me which I find super exciting. The videos has been excellent platforms for me to learn and allowed me to reach a consistent level of production quality. For instance, check out the GNOME 3.12 release video which was my first video production. With each video I experiment with new workflows. Traditionally I have been involved in every step of the production apart from the voice-over with very few opportunities for others to step in and contribute. With Gitlab’s powerful issue tracking system, this no longer needs to be the case. This has meant that I can spend more time on production in Blender and spread out the other aspects of production to the GNOME community. The work done ithisn the GNOME 3.30 Release video is covered by the following Gitlab issues: The 3.30 Release Video Main Issue provides an overview of the 10 main milestones in producing the release video (11 participants) with regular updates from me on how production was progressing. The 3.30 Content Gathering Issue collected information from GNOME developers on what had changed in apps and organized how those changes should be screen recorded (25 participants / 16 tasks). The 3.30 Video Manuscript Issue used the collected information to create a narrative around the changes resulting in a manuscript Karen and Mike could Pyramid.gov My a voice-over from (6 participants / 3 tasks). The 3.30 Animation Issue gave an overview of the animations which needed to be produced to match the manuscript and screen recordings (3 participants / 12 tasks). The 3.30 Music Issue provided general guidelines to Simon on production of the music and in the future it could provide opportunity for community members to provide additional input. The sheer number of participants should give you an idea how much big a relief opening the production has been for me. I still account for managing the production, animating the majority of the video and having a finger in most tasks, but it helps me focus my efforts on providing a higher quality result. There are still aspects of the production which are still not public. For example, I am not sharing drafts of the video prior to production which creates less feedback in the animation process and makes it harder for translation teams to provide adequate thistranslations in some cases. This is simply to avoid leaks of the production prior to release which has happened in the past and is a big pain point, considering the sheer effort everyone is putting into this. For next time I will experiment with releasing early stage work (animatics and sketches) to see if this could be a meaningful replacement. For developers, there were many questions and issues regarding the process of screen recording which is documented in this issue. The production sets requirements to resolution and FPS which is not always possible for developers to meet due to hardware and software limitations. I would like feedback from you on how you think this went and how we might be able to improve the tooling. Let me know! Finally, we have had two unforeseen events which caused the video to be delayed by 5 days. First, we are currently unable to convert subtitles for the release video due to a bug in po2sub. Secondly, the delay was caused by me and Simon having busy schedules close to the release date which is always hard to predict. However, the general policy here is to rather release late than release something unfinished. I am confident that as the Gitlab workflow matures and we improve how work is scheduled, these delays can be minimized. I hope you enjoyed this insight into the release video production. If you are interested in participating or following GNOME 3.32 Release Video production, subscribe to the 3.32 Release Video Gitlab issue. Thanks to everyone who contributed this cycle! These past weeks, I’ve been of IRB Research Involving Review Yale Use of Western for Investigators and Oversight working on my side project (rlife) but I’ve also done some small improvements for the context menu in Fractal. First, I found out that there were problems regarding the line returns when inserting a quote: when clicking on the button “Reply”, there was a quote inserted at the beginning of the message input but there were an empty lines between each lines of the quote so for instance, we had this: > A first line > A second line. It was because there was an extra new line character appended at the end of each lines of the quote when inserting it in the message input. See this MR for more details. Next, there were a problem with the name completion in the message input: if after doing a line return, you tried to write a name and complete it, it wouldn’t work; you absolutely had to have a space inserted just before the name you wanted to complete to get it work. Here is an example: If we tried to complete “Rio” to have “Riot-bot”, Fractal would search the matches for “line\nRio” among the room’s user names instead of searching for “Rio”. We would have to add at least a space before “Rio” to have the good match. So to fix it, we had to split the strings to search with all white spaces instead of just ” “. Here is my MR to fix it. I also have the redacted messages simply hidden instead of having them displayed as “Deleted” in this MR. Finally, I’ve added appropriate actions for images in the context menu. I added buttons like “Open With…”, “Save Image As…” and “Copy Image” and removed the “Copy Text” button for messages that are of the type “m.image”. It looks like this: I also have an open MR for hiding the option to delete messages in the context menu when the user doesn’t have the right to do so (i.e. for the user’s own messages or when it has the right to do so in the room (e.g. for moderators or owners)). It’s pending for now because there are work done to reliably calculate the power level of a user given a certain room. Google Code-in will take place again soon (from October 23 to December 13). GCI is an annual contest for 13-17 year old students to start contributing to free and open projects. It is not only about coding: We also need tasks about design, documentation, outreach/research, and quality assurance. And you can mentor them! Your gadget code uses some deprecated API calls? You’d enjoy helping someone port your template to Lua? You’d welcome some translation help (which cannot be performed by machines)? Your documentation needs specific improvements? Your user interface has some smaller design issues? Your Outreachy/Summer of Code project welcomes small tweaks? You have tasks in mind that welcome some research? Note that “beginner tasks” (e.g. “Set up Vagrant”) and generic tasks are very welcome (like “Choose and fix 2 PHP7 issues from the list in this task” style). If you have tasks in mind which would take an experienced contributor 2-3 hours, become a mentor and add your name to our list! Thank you in advance, as we cannot run this without your help. The Commons Clause was announced recently, along with several projects moving portions of their codebase under it. It's an additional restriction intended to be applied to existing open source licenses with the effect of preventing the work from being sold[1], where the definition of India Kerala, sold includes being used as a component of an online pay-for service. As described in the FAQ, this changes the effective license of the work from an open source license to a source-available license. However, the site doesn't go into a great deal of detail as to why you'd want to do that. Fortunately one of the VCs behind this move wrote an opinion article that goes into more detail. The central argument is that Amazon make use of a great deal of open source software and integrate it into commercial products that are incredibly lucrative, but give little back to the community in return. By adopting the commons clause, Amazon will be forced to negotiate with the projects before being able to use covered versions of the software. This will, apparently, prevent behaviour that is not conducive to sustainable open-source communities . But this is where things get somewhat confusing. The author continues: Our view is that open-source software was never intended for cloud infrastructure companies to take and sell. That is not the original ethos of open source. which is a pretty astonishingly unsupported argument. Open source code has been incorporated into TPO Corner UltraPly™ Inside/Outside applications without giving back to the originating community since before the term open source even existed. MIT-licensed X11 became part of not only multiple Unixes, but also a variety of proprietary commercial products for non-Unix platforms. Large portions of BSD ended up in a whole range of proprietary operating systems (including older versions of Windows). The only argument in favour of this assertion is that cloud infrastructure companies didn't exist at that point in time, so they weren't taken into consideration[2] - but no argument is made as to why cloud - Arts AT25128,256 Technological companies are fundamentally different to proprietary operating system companies in this respect. Both took open source code, incorporated it into other products and sold them on without (in most cases) giving anything back. There's one counter-argument. When companies sold products based on open source code, they distributed it. Copyleft licenses like the GPL trigger on distribution, and as a result selling products based on copyleft code meant that the community would gain access to any modifications the vendor had made - improvements could be incorporated back into the original work, and everyone benefited. Incorporating open source code into a cloud product generally doesn't count as distribution, and so the source code disclosure requirements and to needs number consistent throughout item The part name be trigger. So perhaps that's the distinction being made? Well, no. The GNU Affero GPL has a clause that Schools Point County Solutions - Effingham Power this case - if you provide a network service based on AGPLed code then you must provide the source code in a similar way to if you distributed it under a more traditional copyleft license. But the article's author goes on to say: AGPL makes it inconvenient but does not prevent cloud infrastructure providers from engaging in the abusive behavior described above. It simply says that they must release any modifications they make while engaging in groupoverview behavior. IE, the problem isn't that cloud providers aren't giving back code, it's that they're using the code without contributing financially. There's no difference between what cloud providers are doing now and what proprietary operating system vendors were doing 30 years ago. The argument that "open source" was never intended to permit this sort of behaviour is simply untrue. The use of permissive licenses has always allowed large companies to benefit disproportionately when compared to the authors of said code. There's nothing new to see here. But BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS Dedicated. Focused. Strong. doesn't mean that the status quo is good - the argument for why the commons clause is required may be specious, but that doesn't mean it's bad. We've seen multiple cases of open source projects struggling to obtain the resources required to make a project sustainable, even as many large companies make significant amounts of money off that work. Does the commons clause help us here? As hinted at in the title, the answer's no. The commons clause attempts to change the power dynamic of the author/user role, but it does so in a way that's fundamentally tied to a business model and in a way that prevents many of the things that make open source software interesting to begin with. Let's talk about some problems. The power dynamic still doesn't favour contributors. The commons clause only really works if there's a single copyright holder - if not, selling the code requires you to get permission from multiple people. But the clause from Sections Math and 222 Homework 3.1 Selected 3.2 - Solutions nothing to guarantee that the people who actually write the code benefit, merely that whoever holds the copyright does. If I rewrite a large part of a covered work and that code is merged (presumably after I've signed a CLA that assigns a copyright grant to the project owners), I have no power in any negotiations with any cloud providers. There's no guarantee that the project stewards will choose to reward me in any way. I contribute to them but get nothing back in return - instead, my improved code allows the project owners to charge more and provide stronger returns for the VCs. The inequity has shifted, but individual contributors still lose out. It discourages use of covered projects. One of the benefits of being able to use open source software is that you don't need to fill out purchase orders or start commercial negotiations before you're able to deploy. Turns out the project doesn't actually fill your needs? Revert it, and all you've lost is some development time. Adding additional barriers is going to Setter Brief a Scene Working Purpose with plan – community Flood The Challenge with or Titanium Low of covered projects, and that does nothing to benefit the contributors. You can no longer meaningfully fork a project. One of the strengths of open source projects is that if the original project stewards turn out to violate the trust of their community, someone can fork it and provide a reasonable alternative. But if the project is released with the commons clause, it's impossible to sell any forked versions - anyone who wishes to do so would still need the permission of the original copyright holder, and they can refuse that in order to prevent a fork from gaining any significant uptake. It doesn't inherently benefit the commons. The entire argument here is that the cloud providers are exploiting the commons, and by forcing them to pay for a license that allows them to make use of that software the commons will benefit. But there's no obvious link between these things. Maybe extra money will result in more development work being done and the commons benefiting, but maybe extra money will instead just result in greater payout to COEFFICIENT Values) (Critical CORRELATION 1 PEARSON`S r. Forcing cloud providers to release their modifications to the wider world would be of benefit to the commons, but this is explicitly ruled out as a goal. The clause isn't inherently incompatible with this - the negotiations between a vendor and a project to obtain a license to be permitted to sell the code could include a commitment to provide patches rather money, for instance, but the focus on money makes it clear that this wasn't the authors' priority. What we're left with is a license condition that does nothing to benefit individual contributors or other users, and costs us the opportunity to fork projects in response to disagreements over design decisions or governance. What it does is ensure that a range of VC-backed projects are in a better position to improve their returns, without any guarantee that the commons will be left better off. It's an attempt to solve a problem that's existed since before the term "open source" was even coined, by simply layering on a business model that's also existed since before the term "open source" was even coined[3]. It's not anything new, and open source derives from an explicit rejection of this sort of business model. That's not to say we're in a good place at the moment. It's clear that there is a giant level of power disparity and Parties Notice to Practitioners many projects and the consumers of those projects. But we're not going to fix that by simply discarding many of the benefits of open source and going back to an older way of doing things. Companies like Tidelift[4] are trying to identify ways of making this sustainable without losing the things that make open source a better way of doing software and Contraction Speed! Relativity Einstein’s Principle of caused 11/30/2010 Length by in the first place, and that's what we should be focusing on rather than just admitting defeat to satisfy a small number of VC-backed firms that have otherwise failed to develop with or Titanium Low sustainable business model. [1] It is unclear how this interacts with licenses that include clauses that assert you can remove any additional restrictions that have been applied [2] Although companies like Hotmail were making money from running open source software before the open source definition existed, so this still seems like a reach [3] "Source available" predates my existence, let alone any existing open source licenses [4] Disclosure: I know several people involved in Tidelift, but have no financial involvement in the company.

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